How to Calculate Employee Retention Rate in Your Organization

by Srikant Chellappa Nov 8,2023
Engagedly
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What is the Employee Retention Rate?

The employee retention rate is a crucial metric that provides insights into a company’s ability to retain its workforce over a specific period. This metric is valuable for assessing various aspects, including workplace culture, employee satisfaction, and the overall health of the organization. Understanding and calculating the retention rate is instrumental in evaluating the effectiveness of talent management strategies and employee engagement programs implemented by the company.

Having a lower retention rate could signify challenges in maintaining a stable and experienced workforce. This may result in increased recruitment costs, disruptions in workflow, and potential impacts on overall team morale. Additionally, it might indicate underlying issues with employee satisfaction, engagement, or organizational culture that warrant attention and improvement.

Also Read: 10 Ways to Make Your Employee Recognition Program a Success

Why Prioritize Employee Retention?

how to calculate employee retention?Understanding and enhancing an organization’s employee retention rate holds paramount importance for several compelling reasons:

  • Cost Savings: Low retention rates lead to additional expenses. Businesses incur costs in recruiting, hiring, and training new staff, which can be significantly reduced with effective retention strategies.
  • Productivity and Efficiency: A stable workforce with institutional experience and knowledge tends to boost efficiency and productivity. Maintaining an experienced team through high retention rates minimizes disruptions and enhances overall work output.
  • Organizational Stability: A consistent workforce contributes to a stable workplace environment, positively impacting employee morale and fostering a cohesive company culture.
  • Customer Satisfaction: Content and skilled employees are more likely to deliver superior customer service, directly influencing client satisfaction and loyalty.
  • Employee Engagement: Research consistently indicates a positive correlation between higher retention rates and increased employee engagement. This connection fosters motivation, innovation, and a deep commitment to the organization’s objectives.
  • Long-Term Growth: Employee retention plays a crucial role in promoting sustained organizational growth. Cultivating a dedicated staff over time contributes to the business’s success and resilience in the long run.

How to Calculate Employee Retention Rate

To learn how to calculate the employee retention rate, follow these steps:

  1. Choose the specific duration for which you wish to determine the retention rate. It can be a quarter, year, or any other specified timeframe.
  2. Note the employee count at the beginning and end of the period.
  3. Use the employee retention rate formula below:

Employee Retention Rate = (Number of employees at the end of the period/Number of employees at the start of the period) * 100

  1. The result will be a percentage, representing the proportion of employees who stayed with the company during the selected timeframe.

Employee Retention Rate Example:

  • Assume that you had 1,000 employees at the start of the year.
  • 100 employees left the organization during the chosen timeframe.
  • The remaining 900 indicate the employees who stayed with the company for the year. 
  • Divide 900 by 1000. Whatever the resulting value, multiply by 100.
  • Your Employee Retention Rate = (900/1000) x 100 = 90%

What is a Good Employee Retention Rate? 

A good employee retention rate is often considered higher than the industry average and indicative of a steady and contented workforce. In many businesses, a retention rate of about 90% is regarded as favorable. However, what qualifies as a good retention rate depends on the industry, operation scale, location, and labor market conditions.

A slightly lower retention rate might be viewed positively for certain industries or organizations with unique employee characteristics if it aligns with their specific goals and objectives. For example, if the average retention rate for the IT sector is 80%, a company with a 75% retention rate will be considered fairly well for employees.

In the long run, comparing an organization’s retention rate to industry benchmarks, historical data, and goals is the most useful method for identifying  the staff retention rate. A healthy work environment and long-term employee loyalty and commitment to the organization’s success are fostered by consistently tracking and improving the retention rate.

How to Improve Employee Retention Rate?

Here’s how to improve the employee retention rate:

  • Foster Employee Engagement

Provide professional growth and development possibilities, consult with employees during decision-making, and take their feedback seriously. When employees feel engaged, they connect more with the organization and become more committed to its success. A good manager knows how to spot disengaged employees, understand their issues, and overcome these issues to increase engagement.

Also Read: The Cost of Employee Disengagement
  • Build a Positive Company Culture

Create a helpful and welcoming workplace environment that strongly emphasizes collaboration, openness, and communication. Create an atmosphere where team members can voice concerns and ideas without fear of reprisal. A healthy culture improves job satisfaction and fortifies the connection between employees and employers.

  • Recognize and Reward

To recognize employees’ achievements, establish a strong employee reward and recognition program. Recognize exceptional efforts regularly, personally and collectively, through verbal appreciation, appreciative awards, or monetary or recreational benefits. Employee motivation and job satisfaction can rise when efforts are acknowledged and rewarded, fostering appreciation and loyalty.

  • Offer Opportunities for Career Growth

Establish career paths for employee development through training and mentoring programs. Employees are more inclined to stick around and form a long-term commitment to their roles when they perceive prospects for progress within the company.

  • Conduct Stay Interviews

Stay interviews provide valuable insights into the factors that contribute to employees staying with a company or considering leaving. Consistently inquire about their needs, concerns, and aspirations, using this information to proactively tackle issues and implement changes aimed at enhancing employee retention

  • Conduct Exit Interviews

Exit interviews are a useful technique that give insights into the factors behind high employee turnover. These honest conversations also identify areas where employee retention tactics must be improved. Organizations can identify underlying problems that might not have been obvious during their tenure by actively listening to departing employees and asking open-ended inquiries.

Exit interview input that is actively used to encourage beneficial change demonstrates the organization’s dedication to ongoing development. Thus, using these strategies, organizations can create a work environment where staff members feel valued, involved, and well-supported. 

Eventually, this will help you retain top talent and make your organization a preferred workplace, fostering a culture of continuous improvement and sustained success.

  • Promote Work-Life Balance 

Support work-life balance by offering flexible options like remote work or flexible hours. Encourage employees to take time-offs to avoid burnout and improve their overall well-being. Demonstrate respect for their personal lives and understand the value of juggling family and work obligations. Not doing so can and will result in a high turnover rate!

Summing Up 

In summary, the employee retention rate stands as a critical gauge of an organization’s ability to sustain its workforce. This metric, reflective of workplace satisfaction and stability, is computed by dividing the number of dedicated employees by the initial total count. An optimal retention rate, ideally around 90%, indicates a flourishing environment. The advantages of high retention are manifold, spanning cost savings, heightened productivity, enhanced customer satisfaction, robust staff engagement, and enduring organizational success. Therefore, it’s essential to recognize that investing in retaining top talent isn’t merely a wise choice—it’s the key to unlocking enduring prosperity!

Boost your bottom line with Engagedly, the ultimate employee retention solution! Automating and assisting in performance management and other key HR tasks, we bring the power of AI and digitization to speed things up!

Frequently Asked Questions

Q1. How frequently should businesses calculate their staff retention rates? 

Organizations can check the employee retention rate regularly, like every quarter, six months, or year, depending on their needs and goals. While annual calculations may be useful in identifying long-term patterns, quarterly estimates offer more recent insights.

Q2. How does a lower retention rate affect the bottom line of the organization? 

A lower retention rate can negatively impact the bottom line of an organization by increasing recruitment and training costs, reducing productivity due to constant turnover, and potentially affecting customer satisfaction and employee morale.

Q3. What is an acceptable turnover rate?

Depending on the industry, the size of the organization, and other elements, there are different acceptable turnover rates. For many organizations, a turnover rate of roughly 10% is deemed acceptable.


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Author
Srikant Chellappa
CEO & Co-Founder of Engagedly

Srikant Chellappa is the Co-Founder and CEO at Engagedly and is a passionate entrepreneur and people leader. He is an author, producer/director of 6 feature films, a music album with his band Manchester Underground, and is the host of The People Strategy Leaders Podcast. He is currently working on his next book, Ikigai at the Workplace, which is slated for release in the fall of 2023.

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